The kiss test39 from the double your dating system

If the dashboard is dynamically pulling data from other systems, it’s hard to know if and when a 0 value or a missing value will crop up that breaks a formula.

In our artificial example below, I’ve entered an error-generating formula in cell C6.

Sometimes, I make this be a hyphen (“-“), but, in this example, I’m just going to leave the cell blank (“”): Now, if my value resolves to an error, the Formatted value values don’t expose that error to the recipient of the report: Recurring dashboards and reports should be as automated as possible.

But, it is a nice supplemental visual cue for everyone else.) Typically, I put these threshold cells on their own tab — a Settings worksheet that I ultimately hide.

The best example of this is a footnote that explains when I have red/green values or arrows appearing.

As described in this post, I base that logic on z_thresh Up and z_thresh Down, but my audience doesn’t know that.

I try not to use it if I’m simply putting a value in a cell, because it actually converts the cell value to be a text string, which means I can’t actually treat the value of the cell as a number (which is a problem for conditional formatting, and is a problem if I want to use that cell’s value in conjunction with other values on the spreadsheet).

But, occasionally, I’ll want to put a formatted value in a string of text.

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